Monthly Archives: October 2015

And the Color of the Year 2016 is….

30 Oct 2015 › Posted by Schweitzer Linen

 

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by Phil Taggart

Recently Benjamin Moore (you know, the paint people) announced their “Color Trends 2016 — Color of the Year” and had a launch party down in Varick Street, New York City to celebrate as part of a country-wide roll-out still going on (an event schedule is at the end of the blog).

As a member of the ASID NY Metro chapter we were invited to the celebration and so a great many of the movers & shakers in the design industry gathered to chit-chat, gossip, drink, re-new acquaintances and make new ones at the gala night.

Everyone gathered in an anteroom while waiting for the big reveal, so all the invitees could arrive while we guzzled some champers and downed a few canapés, all suitably appetizing.

Gathering in the anteroom, maybe there’s a hint here?

Gathering in the anteroom, maybe there’s a hint here?

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Characteristics of the Different Types Of Lace

29 Oct 2015 › Posted by Schweitzer Linen

This is part 3 of our Sumptuous History of Lace. Read part 1 here and part 2 here.

Alençon – A fine, needle-point lace, so called from Alençon, a French city, in which its manufacture was first begun. It is the only French lace not made upon the pillow, the work being done entirely by hand, with a fine needle, upon a parchment pattern in small pieces. The pieces are afterward united by invisible seams. There are usually twelve processes, including the design employed in the production of a piece of this kind of lace, and each of these processes is executed by a special workwoman; but in 1855, at Bayeux, in France, a departure was made from the old custom of assigning a special branch of the work to each lacemaker, and the fabric was made through all its processes by one worker.

Schweitzer Linen offers the Tavola Bella Runner (below) — a most decorative topping for tables, sideboards, dressers or wherever you want a delightful touch. Intricately flowered and scalloped Alençon lace, these beautiful imports also make marvelous hostess and holiday gifts.

Tavola Bella

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Lace: A Sumptuous History 1600s–1900s Part 2

20 Oct 2015 › Posted by Schweitzer Linen

This is part 2 of our Sumptuous History of Lace. Read part 1 here.

Ireland

Irish needlepoint lace began at the Presentation Convent in Youghal, County Cork, where Mother Mary Ann Smith had unpicked some Italian lace in order to learn the technique of making it. She began to teach the local women and a lace school was established. Initially, the lace looked very much like the Italian Laces but, with the help of an excellent designer, the Irish Lace soon developed its own characteristics. The lace was a flat type, without a raised, outlining edge and solid areas of the design were opened up with holes to form diamond shapes which were a feature often found in Venetian laces. The open fillings were in single or double Brussels ground, sometimes decorated with tiny rings, sometimes shamrocks and flowers which were either stylized of naturalistic and the leaves were always serrated, like rose leaves.

Youghal edging with a variety of fillings, early 20th century (GHR.2.2004) Image retrieved from The Lace Guild (www.laceguild.org)

Youghal edging with a variety of fillings, early 20th century (GHR.2.2004)
Image retrieved from The Lace Guild (www.laceguild.org)

Detail from a Youghal collar showing the loops of stitches around the motifs and outer edge and the ground of picot-decorated bars, c. 1900 (JPO.1.2002). Image retrieved from The Lace Guild (www.laceguild.org)

Detail from a Youghal collar showing the loops of stitches around the motifs and outer edge and the ground of picot-decorated bars, c. 1900 (JPO.1.2002). Image retrieved from The Lace Guild (www.laceguild.org)

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TAGS  ›  lace